UNE News




North African scholar Ali Ahmida publishes 2nd edition of book on roots of modern Libya

posted Jun 3, 2010, 11:37 AM by Dick Buhr

Ali Abdullatif Ahmida, Ph.D., professor and chair of the University of New England's Political Science Department, provides a provocative study analyzing the social, cultural, and historical roots of modern Libya in the second edition of his book, The Making of Modern Libya:  State Formation, Colonization, and Resistance, Second Edition  (State University of New York Press).

The Making of Modern Libya is a thorough examination of the social, cultural, and historical background of modern Libya.  Ahmida examines the reaction of the ordinary Libyan people to colonialism and nationalism, from the early nineteenth century through the end of anticolonial resistance, to the rise of the modern Libyan state in 1951.

Weaving together insights drawn from Arabic, French, English, and Italian sources, Ahmida challenges Eurocentric theories of social change that ignore the internal dynamics of native social history.

Among other things, he shows that Sufi Islam, tribal military organization, and oral traditions were crucial in the fight against colonialism. The political and cultural legacy of the resistance has been powerful, strengthening Libyan nationalism and leading to the revival of strong attachments to Islam.

The memory of this period has not yet faded, and appreciation of this background is essential to understanding modern Libya. This new edition also investigates Libya’s postcolonial nationalist policies, bringing the argument up to the present.

Ahmida, an internationally recognized scholar of North African history and politics, is the Ludcke Chair of Liberal Arts and Sciences, presented annually to a tenured member of the faculty of the UNE College of Arts and Sciences in recognition of their outstanding academic accomplishments. 

Professor Ahmida has received many other academic grants and awards, such as the Social Science Research Council National Grant Award, the Shahade Award, and the Kenneally Cup Award in 2003 for distinguished academic service at University of New England.

He is the editor of Beyond Colonialism and Nationalism in the Maghrib: History, Culture and Politics, published by Palgrave Press in 2000. He has also recently published in arabic Post-Orientalism: Critical Reviews in North African Social and Cultural History (Center of Arab Unity Studies, Beirut, Lebanon 2009).

Ahmida has lectured in a variety of U.S., Canadian, European and African Universities and colleges, and has contributed several book reviews, articles and chapters to books on the African state, identity and alienation, class and state formation in modern Libya.

20th ANNUAL MAINE GERIATRIC CONFERENCE TO ADDRESS 'WHERE POLICY MEETS PRACTICE'

posted Jun 1, 2010, 7:49 AM by Sherri DeFilipp

The Maine Geriatric Conference, an annual meeting of leading health care providers and professionals involved with elder care issues, will be held June 10-11, 2010 at the Bar Harbor Regency Hotel, Bar Harbor, Maine.  This meeting is the largest and longest-running educational event for health professionals and para-professionals, geriatrics administrators, social workers, care givers, policy makers and others invested in improving the health and lives of Maine's elders.  Sponsors of the conference are the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine, Eastern Maine AHEC, the Maine Gerontological Society, UNE Maine Geriatric Education Center, and Maine Office of Rural Health & Primary Care.

The conference offers a wide range of workshops, as well as networking opportunities.  Continuing professional education credits are available for physicians and PAs, nursing home administrators, and nurses.  Some of the featured topics include:

• When in Doubt, Dog Paddle: An Approach to Leadership Within Health Care Settings
• Health Literacy in Plain Language:  Effective Elder Health Communication
• Nutrition Planning for Healthful Aging
• Functional Fitness and Falls:  An Upright Approach
• The Future of Home- and Community-Based Services in Maine
• A Look into the Crystal Ball of Health Care Reform

For a full listing of workshops and more information, visit the UNE Continuing Medical Education website at http://www.une.edu/com/cme/geriatrics10.cfm or call 207-602-5957.

Literary scholar Cathrine Frank's new book examines the relationship of wills and novels in the transmission of British culture

posted May 28, 2010, 12:58 PM by Dick Buhr

An individual's last will and testament reveals much about a person's sense of self and place in the world. 

In her new book, Law, Literature, and the Transmission of Culture in England, 1837-1925 (Ashgate Press), Cathrine Frank, associate professor of English at the University of New England, explores how the legal bequest of property through the will also reveals the transmission of cultural values. 

Focusing on the last will and testament as a legal, literary, and cultural document, Frank examines fiction of the Victorian and Edwardian eras alongside actual wills, legal manuals relating to their creation, case law regarding their administration, and contemporary accounts of “curious wills” in periodicals.

Her study begins with the Wills Act of 1837 and poses two basic questions: What picture of Victorian culture and personal subjectivity emerges from competing legal and literary narratives about the will, and how does the shift from realist to modernist representations of the will accentuate a growing divergence between law and literature?

Frank’s examination of works by Emily Brontë, George Eliot, Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Anthony Trollope, Samuel Butler, Arnold Bennett, John Galsworthy, and E.M. Forster reveals the shared rhetorical and cultural significance of the will in law and literature. Her study also highlights the competition between these discourses to structure a social order that emphasized self-determinism while at the same time viewing individuals in relationship to the broader community.

Her study contributes to our knowledge of the cultural significance of Victorian wills and creates intellectual bridges between the Victorian and Edwardian periods that will interest scholars from a variety of disciplines who are concerned with the laws, literature, and history of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

“It's easy to play ‘spot the will’ in novels,” Frank said, “but one of the most fascinating things I found in my reading, from judges' opinions to magazine articles, was how widespread the interest in wills was. Everyday people, not just the wealthy and their lawyers, were deeply interested in the idea of the will. It's wonderful to see the book in print and be able to share what I learned. “

Cathrine Frank

Frank, a member of the UNE Department of English and Language Studies, teaches and publishes in the areas of Victorian studies and law and literature. She is co-editor of Law and the Humanities: An Introduction, a collection of original chapters by a selection of distinguished scholars in both the law and the humanities from institutions around the world.

She has presented conference papers on the subject of testamentary law, realism, and legal and literary modes for creating individual and cultural identity. She has published in Law and Literature and in a special issue on law and literature in College Literature.

She is currently working on an essay about privacy, which is part of a new book project on character, or the relationship between writing and reputation in law and literature.
 

Political scientist Ali Ahmida named Ludcke Chair of Liberal Arts and Sciences for 2010-11

posted May 28, 2010, 12:11 PM by Dick Buhr

Biddeford, Maine — The University of New England College of Arts and Sciences has announced that the 2010-2011 Ludcke Chair of Liberal Arts and Sciences has been awarded to Professor Ali Abdullatif Ahmida, Ph.D.  

The Ludcke Chair, funded by a generous bequest from the estate of Eleanor Ludcke (Westbrook College class of 1926), is presented annually to a tenured member of the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences in recognition of their outstanding academic accomplishments. 

The Ludcke Chair recipient receives a stipend in support of their development as a teacher and scholar and gives a public lecture in early December, followed by a reception.

The chair holder must have attained the ideal of the “teacher/scholar,” a dedicated educator and productive researcher who has given generously of their time to the University of New England over a significant period. Professor Ahmida is the chair of the Political Science Department and an internationally recognized scholar of North African history and politics.

Professor Ahmida was born in Libya and educated at Cairo University in Egypt and the University of Washington in Seattle. His specialty is political theory, comparative politics, and historical sociology of power, agency and anti-colonial resistance in North Africa, especially modern Libya.

He has published major articles in Critique, Arab Future, and International Journal of Islamic and Arabic Studies.

He is also the author of The Making of Modern Libya: State Formation, Colonialization and Resistance (State of New York University Press, 1994). This book has been translated into Arabic and was published in a second edition by the Center of Arab Unity Studies (1998, Beirut, Lebanon).

His 2005 book, Forgotten Voices: Power and Agency in Colonial and Postcolonial Libya (Routledge Press) was also translated and issued in Italian and most recently in 2009 in Arabic by the Center of Arab Unity Studies, Beirut.

Professor Ahmida is the editor of Beyond Colonialism and Nationalism in the Maghrib: History, Culture and Politics (Palgrave, 2000). He has also recently published Bridges Across the Sahara: Social, Economic and Cultural Impact of the Trans-Sahara Trade during the 19th and 20th Centuries (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009); and Post-Orientalism: Critical Reviews in North African Social and Cultural History (published in Arabic by the Center of Arab Unity Studies, Beirut, Lebanon 2009)

He has lectured in a variety of U.S., Canadian, European and African universities and colleges, and has contributed several book reviews, articles and chapters to books on the African state, identity and alienation, class and state formation in modern Libya.

Professor Ahmida has received many academic grants and awards, including a Social Science Research Council National Grant Award, the Shahade Award, and the 2003 Kenneally Cup Award for distinguished academic service at the University of New England. Professor Ahmida is the third recipient of the Ludcke Chair.  Elizabeth De Wolfe, professor of History, was awarded the first Ludcke Chair in 2008-2009. Stephan Zeeman, professor of Marine Science, held the Ludcke Chair in 2009-2010.

11 medical students interested in geriatrics are awarded 2010 research and practice fellowships

posted May 24, 2010, 1:27 PM by Sherri DeFilipp

BIDDEFORD, Maine – The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine’s Department of Geriatric Medicine announced that 11 COM students interested in geriatrics have been awarded 2010 research and practice fellowships.

The fellowships include:  Two American Federation for Aging Research (AFAR) Medical Student Training in Aging Research (MSTAR), One American Geriatrics Society/Boston University Summer Institute on Aging, One Betty Ford Summer Institute for Medical Students (SIMS).

Six students participated in the Learning by Living: Nursing Home Immersion Project, and one student participated in the new Learning by Living @ Home Project.

American Federation for Aging Research (AFAR) Medical Student Training in Aging Research (MSTAR)
This prestigious and highly competitive fellowship in the Geriatrics field provides successful candidates with the opportunity to conduct research for 8 weeks during the summer at top ranked Geriatric sites and work beside nationally renowned researchers in the field: 

Jennifer Gibson-Chambers, MS I, Johns Hopkins University Medical School, Geriatrics and Emergency Medicine

Sarah Velten, MS I, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Geriatrics Department

The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine has attained the highest number of AFAR/MSTAR Fellowships Awards of all Osteopathic Medical Schools. Marilyn R. Gugliucci, Ph.D, is their home institution sponsor.

American Geriatrics Society/ Boston University Summer Institute on Aging
This highly competitive Institute is limited to 16 medical students nationwide in their third and fourth year of medical school.

Stephanie  Bissonnette, MS II (soon to be MS III) will be attending this week long institute May 24-May 28th.

Betty Ford Center Medical Student Summer Institute
This clinical training institute provides medical students with the opportunity to live at the Betty Ford Substance Abuse Center in California and work with families and substance abusers for an intense week. University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine student: Robin Caron, MS II, was awarded a position in this institute.

Learning by Living: Nursing Home Immersion Project
Students selected for this one of a kind experience will be admitted into nursing homes for 2 weeks to live the life of an elder resident, complete with a diagnosis and standard procedures of care. Three (3) University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine students, Mekkin Lynch, MS I; Hunter Sweet, MS I; and Jana Tencati, MS I, will be filmed by an independent movie production team during their stay in the homes. Filming begins on May 24th with Mekkin Lynch at St Andres Health Care Facility. Hunter will be admitted into the ME Veterans Home and Jana Tencati will be admitted into the Sarah Neuman Home in NYC.

Additionally, Amy Pratt, MS I will be admitted into the Nashoba Valley Nursing Home in MA; and Matthew Sharbaugh, MS I,  will be living at The Chelsea Soldiers Home also in MA. Matt will experience “ward” living, sharing quarters with 11 other residents. These students will not be filmed for the documentary but will have media experiences.

A fourth year medical student from the University of New Jersey Medical and Dental School (Allopathic), Soochong Kim, will be admitted into a nursing home in Manhattan, NY. This is the first time Learning by Living research will be conducted with a medical student in clinical training.

All students will contribute to the Ethnographic/Biographic Research data that has been collected since 2005.

NEW PROGRAM: Learning by Living @ Home
A new research project will be piloted this summer, which is a variation of the Learning by Living© Nursing Home Project.  The Dept of Geriatric Medicine has partnered with the ME Alzheimer’s Association and ME Parkinson’s Association to work with their physicians, patients, and family members so that medical students may experience life in the home of a person living with Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease.  University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine student Shannon O’Connell, MS I, will be the first pioneer for this project.  She will live for 7 days (24/7) in the home of a person with Parkinson’s disease who is confined to a wheelchair and has an 80 yr old spouse who is the primary caregiver. Shannon will first shadow Dr. Ed Drasby (DO, Neurologist) for a day to learn more about the disease from a physician’s perspective and then live in the home to learn about the disease and care giving experiences from the family.  This project utilizes a Qualitative Ethnographic/Case Study research design.
 
Marilyn R. Gugliucci, Ph.D., Director of Geriatrics Education and Research is the home institution sponsor for the fellowship awardees, the “adult child” and research sponsor for the students being admitted into the nursing homes; and the research sponsor for the new  “@ Home” Project.

UNE in the News: David Smith invited to contribute an essay to the first anniversary issue of Forbes India

posted May 24, 2010, 10:27 AM by Sherri DeFilipp

Associate professor of philosophy David Livingstone Smith, Ph.D. is one of 25 people invited to contribute an essay to the first anniversary issue of Forbes India. The special issue entitled "The finest minds on the planet speak on ideas that they promise will change India and the world". The editor, Indrajit Gupta writes "never before has such a constellation of the finest minds around the world graced the pages of an Indian magazine.
The 25 stalwarts who’ve written for this special edition are drawn from a wide array of disciplines: From neurosciences to design, from philosophy to environment, from the information economy to social business. We invited them to answer one central question: What is that one idea that could change the world? The result: An amazing array of essays that provide an exciting peek into the future". Smith's essay is entitled "Inside the mind that kills", and summarizes some of his recent research into dehumanization and violence.

History scholar Eric Zuelow wins American Conference for Irish Studies publishing award

posted May 12, 2010, 7:48 AM by Dick Buhr


The American Conference for Irish Studies (ACIS) awarded the 2009 James S. Donnelly, Sr. Prize for Books on History and the Social Sciences to University of New England Assistant Professor Eric G.E. Zuelow’s recent book, Making Ireland Irish: Tourism and National Identity since the Irish Civil War.

The award was announced at the ACIS annual conference held in State College, Penn. on May 7, 2010.

The James S. Donnelly, Sr. Prize is given annually to the best history/social sciences book published during the previous calendar year; it is the top honor in the field of Irish history.

The nominating committee noted that “in a year with numerous worthy entries” Making Ireland Irish was the “committee’s clear choice.”  They went on to say that the book “stands out as an outstanding scholarly achievement.”

Making Ireland Irish, published by Syracuse University Press, tells the story of the development of Irish tourism since the Irish Civil War.

Drawing on an extensive array of previously untapped or underused sources, Zuelow tells how a small group of tourism advocates, inspired by tourist development movements in countries such as France and Spain, worked tirelessly to convince their Irish compatriots that tourism was the key to Ireland’s economic, social, and cultural success.

Over time, tourism went from being a national joke to a national interest. Men and women from across Irish society joined in, eager to help shape their country and culture for visitors’ eyes. The result was Ireland as it is depicted today, a land of blue skies, smiling faces, pastel towns, natural beauty, ancient history, and timeless traditions.

Earlier this year, Zuelow spoke about the book as part of the University of New England’s Center for Global Humanities Lecture Series.  The lecture is available on the Center’s website.

The American Conference for Irish Studies, founded in 1960, is a multidisciplinary organization with roughly 800 members drawn from the United States, Ireland, Canada, and other countries. 

Dean Marc Hahn and four medical students interviewed in WABI TV story on primary care physician shortage

posted May 11, 2010, 5:27 AM by Dick Buhr

mhahnMarc Hahn, D.O., dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine and senior vice president for health affairs, and medical students Jennifer Enman, Danae Kershner, Kristin Cyr, Katherine Gassman were inteviewed on a WABI TV5 (Bangor) for a May 10, 2010 story about the shortage of primary care physicians. "Students graduate from medical school with significant debt, $100,000 to sometimes more than $200,000 debt," Dr.Hahn said. "The biggest problem is primary care specialties don't always pay as much as some of the sub specialties do."  He said would like to see more programs to help students who go into primary care deal with that debt.. Watch the Video.

UNE in the News: David Smith quoted in Brazilian newspaper O Liberal

posted May 6, 2010, 6:32 AM by Sherri DeFilipp   [ updated May 6, 2010, 7:07 AM ]

Associate professor of philosophy David Smith, Ph.D. was quoted in the April 19th issue of the Brazilian newspaper O Liberal. The article is entitled "Hábito de contar mentiras é doença?" ("Is the habit of lying a disease?"). Smith is the author of "Why We Lie: The Evolutionary Roots of Deception and the Unconscious Mind."

UNE's Coastal Healthy Communities Coalition promotes safe prom and graduation tips

posted May 3, 2010, 12:04 PM by Sherri DeFilipp

It’s prom and graduation time - a time for celebration. Unfortunately, too often these celebrations have become rites of passage involving alcohol. One risky decision involving alcohol can result in tragedy for not only the young person, but for his or her family, friends, and our entire community.
 
In a 2009 survey, 60% of high school students told us they could easily get alcohol if they wanted to. We all have a stake in keeping alcohol away from teens. Kids who believe alcohol is hard to get, think they would be caught by their parents or the police if they did drink, or feel people in their community disapprove of underage drinking are less likely to drink - and more likely to have a safer night.

How can we work together to keep our kids safe from alcohol-related injuries? Here is some advice and requests from the Coastal Healthy Communities Coalition at the University of New England:

• Clerks and wait staff: be especially diligent about carding during prom and graduation nights, and report any underage drinking or furnishing concerns to the local police.
• Law enforcement: our local police and sheriff departments have adopted strict policies regarding underage drinking, and have scheduled underage drinking details for prom night to search for and respond to any parties or other concerns.
• Community members: help keep kids safe by calling your local police department with any underage drinking concerns, your call can be anonymous, and your tip could save a life.
• Parents: help teens plan a safe night by not serving or allowing alcohol at any party you are hosting. Although 1/3 of underage drinking deaths are due to auto crashes, the other    2/3 are due to injuries from alcohol poisoning, falls, burns, drowning and assaults. Taking away the keys does not make underage drinking safe.
• Seniors: celebrate safely. Tell us what we can do to help you have a night to remember, for all the right reasons.

Maine Liquor and Liability Laws - It Can Cost You!

Furnishing Liquor to a Minor Allowing minors other than your own children to drink alcohol in your home (even if you do not supply the alcohol) is a criminal offense that may result in fines from $500 to $2,000 and/or a jail sentence from 6-12 months. If an injury or death occurs, the person responsible for furnishing the alcohol may be charged with a felony.

Maine Liquor Liability Act A non-licensed, social host (any person who does not hold a Maine Liquor License) can be sued for providing liquor to a minor. Damages may be awarded for property damage, bodily injury, or death caused by the consumption of liquor served. The limit on awards is $250,000 plus unlimited medical expenses.

Let’s work together to provide a safe, alcohol-free season of celebrations for our sons and daughters. For more tips on keeping kids healthy & safe contact the Coastal Healthy Communities Coalition at the University of New England www.une.edu/chcc or go to Maineparents.net  

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